Man sells insane video game collection on Ebay

7 11 2007

Bidding is currently at $3,550 with 27 bids and his Buy it Now price is sitting pretty at $10,979. Here are the systems listed according to his Ebay description page:

The following systems are represented in this auction: Atari 2600, Atari 7800, Atari Jaguar, Atari Lynx, Coleco ColecoVision, Coleco Gemini, Coleco Telstar, Commodore 64/128, GCE Vectrex, Mattel Aquarius, Mattel Intellivision, Mattel Odyssey 2, Microsoft Xbox, Microsoft Xbox 360, APF TV Fun, Miscellaneous Handheld Games, Miscellaneous PC Games, SC Eight Thousand, Sega Pods, Miscellaneous TV Games, NEC Turbo Duo, Nintendo DS, Nintendo Game Boy Advance, Nintendo GameCube, Nintendo NES, Nintendo Nintendo 64, Nintendo Super NES, Nintendo Virtual Boy, Nintendo Wii, Sega Dreamcast, Sega Game Gear, Sega Genesis, Sega Master System, Sega Saturn, SNK Neo Geo, SNK Neo Geo Pocket, Sony Playstation, Sony Playstation 2, Texas Instruments TI 99/4A, VM Labs Nuon.

Add in all the games and people have a total of 1,768 items up for grabs. It’s total madness.

See the images here

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Microsoft to launch ‘Green X’ Campaign

5 11 2007

Microsoft has reportedly teamed up with 15 partners to launch an online scavenger hunt called “X Marks the Spot.” Microsoft will be giving ten clues daily from November 5, 2007 to December 10, 2007. If you find all of the devices you will be entered into a drawing to win over $100,000 in prizes. But don’t believe my word, check it out to see the exact prizes.

 Check it out yourself!





Does Mass Effect have a future on PS3?

4 11 2007

This month will garnish what is widely regarded as a 2007 Game of the Year candidate. Developed by Bioware, Mass Effect is said to be a spectacular new vision of the future set in a bright universe, with a dark secret. What made this game truly special, at-least to Microsoft is that Bioware had plans to develop this title as an exclusive trilogy with all three games spanning the life span of the Xbox 360 console.

To Microsoft, Mass Effect was, and still possibly is, the bread and butter for the Xbox 360, especially since the Halo trilogy has came to a successful end. However, recent industry transactions have created clouds of doubt over Mass Effect and it’s future of the IP still staying 100% exclusive to the Xbox 360. This could lead to the possibility of Mass Effect and Mass Effect 3 coming to the PlayStation 3 console in the future.

The day was October 11th, 2007 when it all went down. Videogames giant, Electronic Arts, purchased the holding company that owns Bioware and Pandemic for USD 800 million.

“We are truly excited by John Riccitiello’s new vision for EA,” said Ray Muzyka, Co-founder and CEO of BioWare Corp. in a news release Thursday. “This vision is consistent with BioWare’s focus on crafting the highest quality story-driven games in the world. It will enable us to further the careers of the passionate, creative and hard working teams at BioWare Edmonton and BioWare Austin.”

Now, let us back up for a moment here and comprehend what is going on. Everyone who has followed the gaming industry for at-least the past five years or so would tell you that Electronic Arts is not akin to console specific games. Indeed, they even came out and publicly stated that they are for one universal gaming console, eliminating the three-way or sometimes two-way console wars t hat we are all used to today.
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Apps Already Coming for Google’s New OpenSocial

3 11 2007

A day after MySpace and Google sent shockwaves through the Web 2.0 world, third-party developers already are announcing plans to build applications using their jointly developed social network APIs.

MySpace and Google announced Thursday that they had joined forces

to create a set of APIs that can be used to by third parties to create social applications on a variety of sites.

Plaxo, for example, Friday unveiled new dynamic profiles that support Google’s new OpenSocial APIs. Users of Plaxo’s Pulse social network can now create distinct professional and personal profiles that include photos, contact information and privacy settings. Any applications written to the Google OpenSocial APIs can be embedded in the profiles, Plaxo said.

The impetus behind OpenSocial, Google said, was to allow developers to learn one API and then be able to write a social application for any OpenSocial partner site. “And because it’s built on Web standards like HTML and JavaScript, developers don’t have to learn a custom programming languages,” noted Amar Gandhi and Peter Chane, group product managers at Google in a blog post.

Google estimates that more than 200 million users of the Web sites that have committed to OpenSocial, like MySpace, Friendster and LinkedIn, will have access to these applications.

“Perhaps most interestingly, we will see social capabilities move into new contexts,” the two noted in the blog. “OpenSocial will also work in nontraditional social contexts, such as on Salesforce.com and Oracle. With a common set of APIs, it will be even easier to extend social functionality. Beyond the many fun and entertaining social applications we already have seen, we think we’ll see a number of social applications emerge in business contexts.”

Marc Andreessen, who co-founded Netscape (later acquired by AOL in 1998) blogged that OpenSocial dispels the common assumption held by some that Facebook has established unquestionable dominance in the social networking world. He noted that while many people assumed in the mid-1990s that AOL owned the Web because it had amassed tends of millions of users, it lost its dominance when broadband became widely available and people no longer needed a dial-up ISP.

“I am not predicting the death of Facebook,” Andreesen blogged. “I think the Facebook people are brilliant and are going to do very well over the next several years. But the idea that you hear from time to time that ‘all the users are on Facebook’ and ‘the game is over; the Facebook platform has won’ is silly, as you can see every time you use a web site that doesn’t end in aol.com.”

Andreessen, of course, founded Ning, a company that allows users to build their own social networks and is an OpenSocial partner. Ning plans to make OpenSocial applications available to all of its 113,000 social networks later this year or early next spring, the company said. OpenSocial applications will run inside social networks across Ning, the company said.

“All of the partners finalizing and releasing all of the initial OpenSocial container and application implementations, of course,” Andreessen noted in his blog. Everyone can just smell the opportunity, and people are going to drive to ship as quickly as possible.”





Facebook’s Stock options

1 11 2007

Cash is good, and Facebook, following its $240 million investment from Microsoft, now has plenty of it. It might have much much more if reports prove true that other investors have, or will soon, join in. With those lofty sums, Mark Zuckerberg and his crew can hire armies of programmers, build data centers, acquire other startups and do whatever else they need to do to make the company grow.

There’s at least one way, however, in which the fallout from this blockbuster financing round could hurt: it will make Facebook’s stock options — the main financial incentive to work at any Silicon Valley company – much less attractive. Options, of course, give the employee the right to buy stock at a given price. That price will go up significantly for options granted to new employees following Microsoft’s investment and Facebook’s jump in valuation to $15 billion. That means that options granted from now on will be less valuable than those the company awarded before the financing round.

Jim Breyer, a Facebook board member, declined to comment on the specifics of the financing or the valuation of employee stock options. But he said Facebook was likely to remain attractive to many recruits. Read the rest of this entry »





Google’s OpenSocial is not a Facebook killer

1 11 2007

For the last year, Sergey Brin has been campaigning at Google with the slogan “features not products” in an attempt to reduce the sprawl of the company’s eccentric creativity.

This campaign may have gone too far, at least when it comes to Google’s new OpenSocial initiative. Google’s new programming interface that allows social networks to communicate with applications is a nifty add-on feature, but it’s not a product. And thus it doesn’t compete with Facebook, despite the dozens of blog posts that say it does.

I can’t believe OpenSocial, in itself, can revive Google’s Orkut social network, which is moribund most everywhere except Brazil. That said, if there are developers who write applications in Portuguese, Orkut could become even more popular and more widely used in Brazil than it already is.

Think about Facebook. If you like Facebook, it’s still because of its core features — the way it lets you communicate and keep tabs on your friends. If you like any of the new applications, it is because on the margin they let you do what you already like doing a bit better. You can throw a sheep at someone instead of poking them. I haven’t seen a Facebook application so compelling that you would join Facebook just to use it.

The frenzy about open platforms misses an essential truth: no one will go through an open door if there isn’t something worthwhile on the other side. The best example of the sort of platform that works is Google Maps. It is a powerful, flexible way to display geographic information. When combined with interesting data, the results can be compelling. (Here is the Los Angeles Times’s wildfire map. Here is a blog with many more examples.)

Social networks do have interesting data that could be used in a mashup application: Profiles of members, and links that define the relationships between members. But this data is only useful if the network has deep penetration of the people users care about. I can see why Marc Andreessen’s Ning, which helps create custom social networks for little league teams and such, might find OpenSocial useful. Read the rest of this entry »





Google leads group assault on Facebook

1 11 2007
The search engine and its allies will offer a single, cross-site open platform, hoping to lure developers away from Facebook

Google and some of the world’s largest social networks have launched their most aggressive attack yet on Facebook, their young rival.

An alliance of companies led by the search engine is planning to introduce a set of common standards that will let software developers write programs for Google’s social network, Orkut, and others such as LinkedIn and Friendster.

The strategy draws inspiration from a feature introduced by Facebook earlier this year, which enables outside developers to write applications for the site, which can then be downloaded and shared by Facebook users.

A cross-site, open platform will, Google hopes, be more attractive to developers than Facebook, and siphon off some of the momentum from the rapidly growing site, for which more than 5,000 applications have been written since it opened its platform in May. Read the rest of this entry »